Memories of ex-DeMatha star Sid Catlett

Sid Catlett, courtesy of DeMatha High School, in about 1965
Sid Catlett, courtesy of DeMatha High School, in about 1965

I didn’t really know Sid Catlett.

But a couple of years ago, I got to spend more than an hour on the phone with him. I’d called him for an interview for something I was working on about D.C. area high school basketball. I’d asked for about 15-20 minutes of his time.

What I got was more than 60 minutes of history, philosophy, reflection, gratitude and thought-provoking observations on learning, life and growing up with the game in Washington, D.C.

Continue reading Memories of ex-DeMatha star Sid Catlett

Williams and Ferry inducted into Washington Metro Hall of Fame

Walt Williams
Walt Williams in 1991

Prince George’s County was well-represented at the Wooden Leadership in Coaching awards dinner Thursday night at the Watergate Hotel in downtown Washington.

Walt Williams (Temple Hills, MD) and Danny Ferry (Bowie, MD) were inducted into the Washington Metropolitan Basketball Hall of Fame.

Both were high school standouts, with Williams playing on Crossland HS team that reached the Class AA state basketball finals three years in a row (1986-88). Ferry, of course, played at storied DeMatha Catholic HS, where the team he played on in his junior year (1983-84) wound up 29-2 and ranked No. 1 nationally by USA Today.

Continue reading Williams and Ferry inducted into Washington Metro Hall of Fame

Fultz latest in long line of local products to go high in NBA Draft

DeMatha's Markelle Fultz (pictured) is the fifth D.C.-area player to be taken No. 1 overall in the NBA Draft.
DeMatha’s Markelle Fultz is the fifth D.C.-area player to be taken No. 1 overall in the NBA Draft.

With his selection as the first overall pick by the Philadelphia 76ers in the 2017 NBA Draft, DeMatha’s Markelle Fultz became the fifth D.C.-area player ever to be taken No. 1 overall.

Several accounts (wrongly) trumpeted the fact that Fultz would be the first local native chosen No. 1 overall since Mackin/Notre Dame star Austin Carr in 1971. But that overlooks Osbourn Park’s David Robinson in 1987.

Continue reading Fultz latest in long line of local products to go high in NBA Draft

Former local stars shuffle at Maryland

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Kevin Broadus comes to the University of Maryland

For a long time, it seemed like local basketball fixture Kevin Broadus (Blair/Dunbar) might wind up working for every local college basketball program but Maryland.

 

Over the year, he embarked on a tour of the area’s colleges as an assistant coach, working at Bowie State, UDC, American University, George Washington and Georgetown (twice).

Broadus was finally able to complete the local circuit when Maryland head coach Mark Turgeon added him to the Terrapins’ coaching staff last week. There, Broadus’ numerous local connections are expected to come in handy on the recruiting trail.

“We are thrilled to welcome Kevin to the Maryland basketball family,” Turgeon said in a statement released by the athletic department. “Kevin has a strong reputation as a tireless recruiter and is passionate about developing players on and off the court. He has extensive knowledge and experience as a coach and I am confident his ties to this region will be extremely valuable to our program.”

“It is an honor and a privilege to work with coach Turgeon,” Broadus said in the same news release. “I have watched him from afar and really admire him. He has been very successful everywhere he has been. I am excited to be a part of this program and continue to build on the success they have had.”

Broadus will replace Cliff Warren on the coaching staff. Warren, a star player at Paint Branch High School in nearby Burtonsville, had expressed a desire to come off the road and spend more time with his family. He assumes a new role as the Maryland basketball program’s director of player development.

“Cliff shared his desire of tending to family matters and this new position will allow him to do so,” Turgeon said. “He has been an outstanding mentor and role model to our team. Cliff will continue to play an integral role in supporting and guiding our student-athletes academically as well as helping them achieve success on and off the court.”

Broadus, 53, is probably most known for his work as an assistant at Georgetown. There, he coached and helped recruit future NBA players like Jeff Green, Roy Hibbert and Otto Porter.

Broadus sandwiched two different stints at Georgetown totaling nine years around a successful but controversial two-year stint as the head coach at Binghamton. There, he led the team to the NCAA tournament in his second year. He was later forced to step down after admitting to improper contact with a recruit during a so-called “dead period.” Broadus later sued the university and the state higher education system in New York for discrimination, but agreed to resign after getting a $1.2 million settlement. An NCAA investigation cleared him of any wrongdoing.

TRIMBLE’S NUMBERS: Most every story about Melo Trimble’s decision to leave the University of Maryland for the NAB after three years mentioned that he was part of 79 Maryland victories.

That got me to thinking: Where does that total of 79 victories rank among other great players who have worn the Maryland red and white?

The answer is: pretty high.

In some sense, measuring the O’Connell grad against Maryland stars of the past is comparing apples and oranges because prior to the 1972-73 season, players had to sit out their freshman seasons. Then, too, college basketball teams typically play more games now than they did 45 years ago – back when Maryland’s basketball first gained national prominence.

In 1972-73 and 1974-75, for example, Maryland reached the Elite Eight of the NCAA Tournament and still played just 30 and 29 games, respectively. This past season – Trimble’s last, as it turns out – Maryland played 33 games even with its disappointing first-round NCAA Tournament exit.

That said, Trimble’s number are impressive my almost any measure. He is one of just two players in school history (Terrence Morris is the other) to play for three consecutive teams that won at least 25 games. Even if great postseason success eluded Trimble and the Terps, that run of excellence has to count for something.

Trimble’s three-season victory total doesn’t quite match that of Lonny Baxter (Springbrook/Anacostia) and Juan Dixon, who accumulated 82 victories – including the national championship – in three varsity seasons from 2000-2002.

The pair of Steve Blake and Drew Nicholas played on teams that won 78 games in their last three varsity seasons (2001-2003). Morris’ last three Maryland teams managed 73 victories, as did the 1972-74 teams spearheaded by Tom McMillen and Len Elmore. The John Lucas-Maurice Howard Terrapin squads of 1973 to 1975 accumulated 70 victories. Adrian Branch (DeMatha) helped win 69 games for the Terps from 1983 to 1985. Local legend Len Bias (Northwestern), meanwhile, won 68 games in his last three seasons in a Maryland uniform.

Offense is the order of the day at Capital Classic

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Bruno Fernandez, of the IMG Academy in Montverde, FL, did not play due to a minor knee injury suffered in practice Friday.

The 44th annual Capital Classic at Verizon Center on Saturday wasn’t exactly perfect.

But Dhamir Cosby-Roundtree was.

The 6-foot-8 Villanova recruit out of Philadelphia’s Neumann Goretti High School scored 18 points and didn’t miss a shot as the United States All-Stars prevailed over the Capital All-Stars, 113-101.

“I got a lot of dunks,” Cosby-Roundtree said. “I was just trying to do whatever I could to help get the lead up.”

Continue reading Offense is the order of the day at Capital Classic

Stars come out at Verizon Center as Capital Classic returns to downtown

After a nomadic existence the last few years, the Capital Classic high school all-star basketball game is returning to downtown D.C.

The 44th annual game will be played at the Verizon Center on April 8, with the preliminary game, featuring the District All-Stars against the Suburban All-Stars at 11 a.m. The main game, pitting of team of  U.S. all-stars against the a team of local standouts, is scheduled to tip off at 1 p.m.

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Maryland signee Darryl Morsell of Baltimore’s Mount Saint Joseph High School is one of the high school stars on display at the 2017 Capital Classic.

Continue reading Stars come out at Verizon Center as Capital Classic returns to downtown

Forty years ago, TC Williams wrote the perfect ending

It was 40 years ago this week that the 1976-77 T.C. Williams basketball team capped one of the great seasons in Northern Virginia basketball history.

The Titans (28-0), ranked No. 1 in both the Washington Star and Washington Post high school basketball polls, finished off an undefeated season wit
h a 95-63 rout of William Fleming of Roanoke in the Virginia Class AA final at University Hall in Charlottesville
Fleming was no match for the Titans, who rang up 28 TC williams HS
points in both the second and third quarters of the game to pull away. Playing the baseline-to-baseline, up-tempo style that had made them so successful during the regular season, that T.C. Williams team set state tournament records for single-game scoring (95 points) and its two-game total (261) as well.

Continue reading Forty years ago, TC Williams wrote the perfect ending

50 years ago Carr drives Mackin over DeMatha

Austin Carr headshot

By 1967, legendary coach Morgan Wootten had firmly established DeMatha as the premier high school basketball program in the Washington area.

Taking over the top spot after the Archbishop Carroll dynasty had run its course, the Stags reigned as the best team in the area for the next half-dozen years, and even garnered national attention following their upset of New York’s Power Memorial and superstar Lew Alcindor in 1965.

Austin Carr headshot
Austin Carr

Throughout that period, league rival Mackin also established itself as one of the best programs around. During a five-season run, from 1961-66, the Trojans – then coached by Paul Furlong – ran up a record of 133-33.

That would be an admirable showing against any level of competition. It was even more impressive considering now-closed Mackin competed in the Washington Catholic League against the likes of DeMatha, Carroll and St. John’s. Then, as now, the league featured some of the best high school basketball around.

But as good as Mackin was during that stretch, it could never unseat DeMatha. The Stags won the league title every year from 1961-66 and would win it again every year from 1968-76.

But 50 years ago this week, Mackin was finally able to knock DeMatha from the top of the league standings and the top of the local high school basketball rankings.

DeMatha didn’t lose often. On the rare occasions the Stags did lose, it took an oustanding player, or team, or circumstance to beat them.

In the first week of March in 1967, Mackin had at least two of the three factors in their favor. Star guard Autin Carr scored 21 points (including the 2,000th of his pep career) as Mackin downed DeMatha, 54-48, on the night of March 3, 1967.

It was, by all accounts, the biggest regular-season high school game of the year, and mabe the biggest locally since the DeMatha-Power clash two years before. To accommodate the huge crowd expected, the game was moved to Cole Field House at the University of Maryland, where a throng of 8,500 gathered to watch the show.

They saw a classic. DeMatha led by nine (16-7) early in the game, but the margin remained within three points for much of the game, with neither team able to gain much of an edge. Mackin’s Richie Ford hit a basket early in the fourth quarter to give the Trojans the lead for good at 42-41. The previous three baskets in the game resulted in the lead switching hands – that’s how close it was.

Austin Carr #34 at Notre Dame
Austin Carr at Notre Dame

Carr, who had been hot early, but quiet in the middle, delivered at the end. He sank six consecutive free throws in the last two minutes to clinch the game, the league titles and the area’s No.1 ranking for the Trojans.

Carr was as prolific a scorer as any local high school has ever produced. He went on to an All-American career at Notre Dame and was a first-round draft choice in the NBA. But he had lots of help, too. Mackin had a great distributor and defensive player at the point in Sterling Savoy, a talented big man in 6-foot-8 Garland Williams, and another reliable offensive option in Richie Ford. Carr and Williams earned All-Met recognition in the Washington Star for the 1966-67 season; Carr and Savoy were picked for the Washington Post squad. Ford was chosen for All-Met honors the next season.

It had been a long time coming for Mackin. The Trojans had won the first regular-season game between the two powerful teams a little more than a month before. Carr scored 21 points in that first triumph, including a key three-point play with 2:10 left, to lead Mackin to a 55-49 victory over 2,500 fans at Fort Myer across the river in Virginia.

That victory was Mackin’s first over DeMatha in 10 years. The league title was the school’s first – and only – as a member of the Catholic League/Metro Conference. And, it was the only time DeMatha failed to win the crown in that ultra-competitive league between 1961 and 1976.

After Mackin’s second victory over the Stags in ‘67, Furlong made so secret about what his focus had been that season – and in fact his entire coaching career at Mackin up to that point.

“Trying to reach the level Morgan (Wootten) hs established at DeMatha has helped us,” he said. “DeMatha has pride – they’ve had it for a long time – and now we have it.”

Earl Foreman: Lawyer played big role on D.C. pro basketball scene

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Earl Foreman

Earl Foreman didn’t merit an obituary when he passed away last month.

They should have written a book.

That’s the only way to do justice to the wild and crazy ride Foreman took through professional basketball as an owner, investor, and wheeler-dealer.

Continue reading Earl Foreman: Lawyer played big role on D.C. pro basketball scene

Brey has Irish Eyes Smiling

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Mike Brey

Don’t look now, but Mike Brey’s Notre Dame basketball team sits atop what may be the best conference in college basketball.

Nobody should be surprised by this.
It’s the sort of thing the former DeMatha point guard/assistant coach has been doing for a decade and half, ever since he took over the basketball fortunes of the Irish.

Yet somehow – perhaps because of the school’s geographic isolation from its rivals in the Big East and now the Atlantic Coast Conference – Brey’s accomplishments seem to be perpetually overlooked.

Continue reading Brey has Irish Eyes Smiling